Single button remote concept

E: brian@briangarret.com | T: +31(0)6 2870 5316

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During the first semester of the Master Design track I designed and build a new kind of remote for digital television. The design is a protest against the remotes that are currently produced and on the market. A simple to use single button remote control, which allows the user to change channel, volume, pause, play, record and switch the television on and off.

How it works:

The final model is a fully working prototype, with a battery operated micro controller connecting wirelessly with a laptop for demonstration purposes.
The remote can be operated single handed, simply sliding the slider in the desired state, then movements execute the function. The different states are Off, TV, Channels and Volume. In each of the states the movement has different effect. In TV mode it pauses (left) and resumes (right) your digital television show.
In the Channels state movement to left or right allows you to browse through the channels. Once the slider is released the television switches channels and the slider moves back into TV state.
In the volume state movement up increases the volume, and logically movement down decreases the volume.

The Vision:

This remote is not a ready to sell product nor is it intended in that way. The goal of this new remote design is to show how much functionality can be achieved while using only a single button. An important mistake in many new remote control designs is the addition of a second display, hence the television is the primary display. This causes the user to focus on the remote, while the television is where the entertainment happens. This remote takes away this problem, the focus remains on the television since the remote can be used blindly. This concept should inspire designers and engineers to create better everyday products, that focus on pure functionality and good experience.

As seen on Gizmodo, Yanko Design, Geek.com